"This is the trend we support and afterwards we will look into all alternative mechanisms. In essence, this trend is fair, as it links financing with implementation of the necessary structural reforms," Šapoka told BNS.

In his words, the decision would encourage all members of the community to proceed with the reforms.

Currently, financing from Europe's key structural and investment funds is provided, if a country meets certain preconditions in connection to drafting of financing strategies and documents, as well as good administration.

Meanwhile, discussions are in progress to shift the focus to structural reforms, macroeconomics, the legal system and migration. If a country, for instance, fails to abide by the rule of law, financing would be suspended or even halted. This could mean additional risks for Poland, which is criticized for its judicial reforms and refusal to take in refugees.