Such amendments have been proposed by 20 lawmakers from different political, mainly opposition, groups, including the opposition Homeland Union – Lithuanian Christian Democrats, Liberal Movement, Social Democratic Party of Lithuania, as well as MP representing the political group of non-attached members.

"European countries often choose between two options, i.e., a complete ban, already in place in the UK, the Netherlands, Belgium, Austria, Slovenia, Croatia and the Czech Republic, and there's another direction, chosen by Switzerland, where there are high animal wellbeing standards in place and it not cost effective to engage in fur farming," Laurynas Kasčiūnas, representing TS-LKD, told a press conference on Monday.

In his words, European countries are closing fur farms not only because the business itself is increasingly considered unethical, but also due to pollution and environmental impact.

MP Linas Balsys of the non-attached group registered a similar bill some 18 months ago and he hopes the two bills will be merged and received stronger parliamentary support and will move forward.

A compensation mechanism for fur farmers should also be envisaged, Kasčiūnas believes, adding that the government should present its proposals on this issue.